2050

A transport sector with vision: Aviation plans to reduce its CO2 emissions to 50 per cent of 2005 levels by 2050.

  • Fraport Bilddatenbank

2020

Aviation has set itself the task of improving its energy efficiency by a further 1.5 per cent every year until 2020.

  • Lufthansa Bilddatenbank

2012

An important milestone for climate protection in aviation: Since 1.1.2012, aviation has been growing CO2-neutrally. This means the climate will not be additionally polluted, even though aviation continues to grow. This has been made possible by aviation’s participation in the European emissions trading scheme.

  • None
    Lufthansa Bilddatenbank

2011

For the first time, Lufthansa tanks up with biofuel in its daily operations: The effects of the new fuel on both engine and consumption are tested in a six-month pilot project on the route between Frankfurt and Hamburg.

  • Lufthansa Bildarchiv

2011

German air freight celebrates its hundredth birthday.

  • Fraport Bilddatenbank

2010

For the first time in aviation history, air traffic comes to a halt: After the eruption of the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull, the airspace over northern and central Europe is closed for six days between the 15 and 21 April. About 100,000 flights and 10 million passengers are affected.

  • Henrik Thorburn

2001

Air Berlin is the first German airline to equip its fleet with winglets – one example of many fuel-saving technical innovations in aviation.

  • Air Berlin Bildarchiv

2004

German air traffic control forms a joint air space block, “FABEC”, with the Benelux countries, France and Switzerland. In future, European air space is to be organised following major air traffic flows instead of national borders.

  • DFS Deutsche Flugsicherung GmbH

1990

The first German wide-bodied airplane is born: Airbus Industries builds the A321 in Hamburg.

  • Airbus Industries

1981

On 7th July, the Solar Challenger, powered only by sunlight, crosses the British Channel at a speed of over 50km/h.

  • NASA

1970

For the first time, European aircraft manufacturers compete with American: Germany, Spain, France and Great Britain jointly establish Airbus Industries. Its very first plane, the Airbus A 300 B, is an immediate success.

  • Airbus Industries

1970

The era of the wide-bodied airplane begins: The Boeing 747, the world’s largest aircraft, reports for duty.

  • Lufthansa Bildarchiv

1960

Jet engines make air travel not only twice as fast as before, but also more comfortable for passengers. The airplane becomes a mass transport vehicle: The Boeing 707 has space for double the number of passengers of any other earlier airplane.

  • Air Berlin Bildarchiv

1953

The Federal Bureau for Air Traffic Control – the predecessor of German Air Traffic Control (DFS) – is founded. At first, flight controllers monitor all of German airspace by radar.

  • DFS Deutsche Flugsicherung GmbH

1948/1949

Tempelhof Airport saves the life of an entire city. For 15 months, Berliners are provided with foodstuffs and other goods by airlift. The “Candy Bombers” land at a record rate of every 90 seconds.

  • USAF

1926

The first air connection to South East Asia: Lufthansa flies with two Junkers G 24 in 10 stages to Peking.

  • Lufthansa Bildarchiv

1924

Germany’s first flying school opens on the Wasserkuppe mountain at Fulda.

  • Deutsches Bundesarchiv (German Federal Archive)

1919

Civilian air traffic begins: The Deutsche Luft-Reederei (DLR airline) is approved by the Reichsluftamt (Imperial Agency of Aviation) in Berlin as the world’s first civilian airline. Regular post and passenger flights begin between Berlin and Weimar.

  • Lufthansa Bildarchiv

1917

The Allgemeine Elektricitäts-Gesellschaft (AEG) founds the Deutsche Luft-Reederei (DLR). Thanks to Walther Rathenau, AEG’s chairman of the board, German civilian aviation history begins in the middle of the WWI.

  • Deutsches Bundesarchiv (German Federal Archive)
  • None
    Library of Congress: George Grantham Bain Collection

1915

The engineer Hugo Junkers builds the world’s first all-metal aircraft in Dessau.

  • None
    Archiv Bernd Junkers
  • None
    Deutsches Bundesarchiv

1911

A woman conquers the skies for herself: Amelie Hedwig Beese battles through an all-male domain to become Germany’s first female pilot.

  • Deutsches Bundesarchiv (German Federal Archive)

1911

Germany’s first freight plane flies from Berlin to Frankfurt.

  • None
    Lufthansa Bildarchiv

1909

Aviation pioneer August Euler is the first German to acquire the international pilot’s license.

1900

In a floating assembly hall on Lake Constance, Ferdinand Count of Zeppelin builds an airship that bears his name, “Zeppelin”. The Zeppelin’s first flight on the 2 July 1900 lasts 18 minutes. It is then forced to make an emergency landing on Lake Constance for technical reasons.

  • Lexikon der gesamten Technik (1904) von Otto Lueger

1896

On 9 August 1896, aviation pioneer Otto Lilienthal conducts one of his test flights and is by a strong gust of wind. He falls from a height of 15 metres and dies of his injuries the next day, aged 48.

1894

With the “Normalsegelapparat” (“normal soaring apparatus”), Otto Lilienthal develops and produces the first serially manufactured and sold aircraft in history in Berlin.

  • Archiv Otto-Lilienthal-Museum, Urheber: vrmtl. R. Neuhauss, 29.06.1895

1891

German mechanical engineer Otto Lilienthal turn s one of mankind’s oldest dreams into a reality: He is the first person to succeed in flying longer distances by gliding flight. In the following years, the aviation pioneer builds and tests countless devices, with which he manages to fly distances of 50 to 250 meters.

  • Archiv Otto-Lilienthal-Museum, Fotograf: Photographer: A. Regis